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blosxom


Contact/Impressum

       
Wed, 24 Sep 2008
Things I learned about GSM, STK revisited.

During the least couple of days I've had some pretty intense conversations with a number of people on various aspects of GSM, leading me to [re]reading some of the interesting bits of its specification.

There are a number of observations that I don't want to talk about right now, and which will likely be part of my work during the next couple of months.

One thing that ever so often gives me the creeps is STK (Sim Toolkit). To those people involved with GSM, it is no news that with STK an operator can basically remote-control your phone. He can, among other things

  • make your phone send SMS
  • initiate outgoing calls without your interaction
  • initiate outgoing calls and terminate any existing call
  • open data connections (GPRS/EDGE)
  • launch a browser to any URL
  • play tones on your speaker
  • access and modify any information (contact, SMS, dial history, even IMSI) stored on the SIM

And the worst thing of it all: You don't even know which of those features your phone implements (most likely all of them). I'm happy to still use a SIM that predates the GSM11.14 (STK) specification.

Now in the advent of projects like OpenBTS, where we can emulate a GSM network side, and in combination with either supplying your own SIM card (or emulating it using a PC), we will finally see a faint possibility of actually testing (and demoing) the never-ending security nightmares caused by this evil monstrosity.

[ /gsm | permanent link ]