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Sat, 24 Dec 2011
HTCs delays in releasing Linux source code are unacceptable

The Taiwanese smart phone maker HTC is widely known to be delaying its Linux kernel source code releases of their Android products. Initially, this has been described to to the requirement for source code review, and making sure that no proprietary portions are ending up in the release.

While the point is sort-of moot from the beginning (there should be no proprietary portions inside the Linux kernel for a product that wants to avoid entering any legal grey zone in the first place), I was willing to accept/tolerate it for some time.

At one point more than one year ago, gpl-violations.org actually had the opportunity to speak in person to senior HTC staff about this. I made it very clear that this delay is not acceptable, and that they should quickly fix their processes in order to make sure they reduce that delay, eventually down to zero.

Recently, I received news that the opposite is happening. HTC still has the same delays, and they are now actually claiming that even a 120 days delay is in compliance with the license.

I do think neither the paying HTC customers, nor tha Free Software community as a whole have to tolerate those delays. It is true that the GPLv2 doesn't list a deadline until when the source code has to be provided, but it is at the same also very clear what the license wants: To enable people to study the program source code. Especially in todays rapid smart phone product cycles, 120 days is a very long time.

So I hereby declare my patience has ended here. I am determined to bring those outrageous delays to an end. This will be one of my new year resolutions for 2012: Use whatever means possible to make HTC understand that this is not how you can treat Free Software, the community, its customers, the GPL and in the end, copyright itself.

[ /linux/gpl-violations | permanent link ]

Fri, 23 Dec 2011
More "bare iron" development: OsmoSDR, osmo-e1-xcvr and SIM bank

I'm currently quite excited to be doing more bare iron programming as well as actual electrical engineering work again.

There's actually not just one project I'm working on, but a variety of them:

  • OsmoSDR - an upcoming small form-factor, inexpensive USB SDR. Not big and expensive like USRP or real "professional" solutions, but also not as weak as the ultra-narrow-band funcube dongle. I wasn't involved in the hardware design, but have volunteered to take care of the firmware development for the Atmel SAM3U micro-controller inside.
  • osmo-e1-xcvr - a relatively simple circuit board containing the magnetics, LIU, clock generation and transceiver for E1/T1/J1 lines. The idea here is to have a solution for the analog part, as well as HDB3/B8ZS/AMI encoding, which can then be attached to any FPGA, CPLD or micro-controller development board. It exposes SPI for controlling the transceiver, and a synchronous serial bit-stream for Rx and Tx.
  • unnamed sim-bank project - here the goal is to find a cheap solution to attach a large number of SIM cards to either a PC or directly to Ethernet. This can be very useful for testing, where you host your sim cards in a centralized location and can borrow them to remote users/devices over TCP/IP. There are commercial devices available for this, but they are quite expensive (like 1700 USD for 32 card device) and intended to be used with some proprietary windows software (who wants that?!?).

In the latter two projects I'm also doing the component selection, schematics design and PCB layout. One project with KiCAD, the other in EAGLE, as I really want to get first-hand experience of the usability of Free vs. proprietary EDA tools. I'd love to also evaluate Altium Designer, but they are still windows-only, and that would just make life way too difficult for me.

The projects will be duly announced soon, and they are all intended to be Open Hardware designs with Free Software. We'll probably also make all of them available at shop.sysmocom.de, too.

[ /electronics | permanent link ]