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blosxom


Contact/Impressum

       
Sat, 28 Jan 2012
New OsmocomBB RSSI monitor firmware

Jolly has been hacking up a nice new RSSI monitoring firmware application for OsmocomBB.

I let the pictures speak for themselves:

I really hope this trend continues and we'll get some actual user interface in OsmocomBB at some point this year..

[ /gsm/osmocom-bb | permanent link ]

Wed, 25 Jan 2012
OP25 project joins hosting on osmocom.org

Some days ago, I noticed that the famous OP25 project (a Free Software implementation of the APCO25 system, a digital trunked radio system) was no longer reachable on-line. It seems they were running this on a desktop PC in a university. As nobody in the project still seems to be at that university, a change in the network configuration had accidentally rendered the website unreachable.

After some quick e-mails, I offered to host them within the osmocom.org family of Free Software Projects for mobile communications. This is when op25.osmocom.org was created, and a full-site backup uploaded + installed.

I'm really happy that we were able to do a small part to help to make sure this valuable project remains accessible to interested parties in the signal processing and mobile communications field.

[ /gsm | permanent link ]

First osmo-nvs-gps evaluation boards soldered

At the osmocom project, we recently discovered the most interesting NVS NV08C-CSM module. It not only is a superb GPS receiver, but it includes GALILEO and GLONASS receivers, too. However, it's only available as an industry module, or as an expensive (700 EUR or so) evaluation kit.

Given the cheap PCB prototyping service at seeedstudio, I thought I'd spend an afternoon creating the schematics and PCB layout for an evaluation board. It exports the two 3.3V UARTs on OsmocomBB-style 2.5mm jacks, so they can be used with the T191 cables. I have the feeling this 2.5mm jack is becoming a new standard for low-voltage RS232 links ;)

Furthermore, it exports the SPI, I/O and I2C on a 20pin 2.54mm pitch header, connects to an external antenna via a MCX socket and has an optional footprint for a CR2032 battery on the bottom side.

So far, the board seems to be working fine. If there is interest in the bare PCB itself (without components!), please send me an e-mail. Depending on the amount of interest we might add it to the sysmocom webshop.

Schematics and Gerber files will be available at http://openbsc.osmocom.org/trac/wiki/osmo-nvs-gps soon.

[ /electronics | permanent link ]

Tue, 17 Jan 2012
Having Fun with DHL Express!

This is what I got when tracking one of my inbound shipments:

It seems DHL is having fun bouncing the package back and forward between Hong Kong and Leipzig(Germany). So far, it started in HK, then arrived in Leipzig on January 8, went back to HK, back to Leipzig, back to HK, back to Leipzig and is currently allegedly again in Hong Kong _after_ succesfully passing German customs clearance on January 15.

For the TCP/IP nerds among the readers: I wonder when the TTL expires.

[ /misc | permanent link ]

Sat, 14 Jan 2012
First assembled prototypes of osmo-e1-xcvr

I mentioned it briefly before: I've designed a small E1/T1/J1 transceiver board, which is going to be used for experimentally interfacing such a TDM line with microcontroller and/or FPGA. The name of this board is osmo-e1-xcvr.

The first prototype PCBs have arrived yesterday, and despite lots of other more important work I couldn't resist but to actually solder some of the units. The result can be seen here:

I don't have time to do anything beyond very basic testing right now, but so far the boards seem to be doing fine. Now we need a driver for the transceiver chip, and connect its control interface over SPI to some microcontroller (likely sam7s/sam3s/sam3u in my case). The actual serial bitstream will end up at the SSC peripheral of the controller.

[ /electronics | permanent link ]

Tue, 10 Jan 2012
OsmoSDR status update

It's already two weeks since my last post mentioning OsmoSDR only very briefly. By now, OsmoSDR is fully public and you can read all about it on the http://sdr.osmocom.org/ website.

Specifically, the website includes Schematics, and one of my colorful block diagrams. I am a text guy and really hate to work with graphics, but the block diagram of the Calypso has helped a lot in the context of making people understand OsmocomBB, so I tried again for OsmoSDR:

So as you can see, it is a very simple, straight-forward design with a chip tuner, direct I/Q down-conversion, ADC for differential I and Q signals as well as a small FPGA for basic filtering and serial format conversion, followed by a Atmel SAM3U microcontroller (Cortex-M3, high speed USB).

And yes, it's receive only. However, it has a stacking connector for later addition of a transmit daughter-board which may eventually follow later in 2012.

So what is this OsmoSDR going to be used for? Well, for receiving any kind of signals between 64 MHz and 1700 MHz (possibly up to 1800 MHz, untested). We don't build it for a specific application, but we simply thought that for many applications a member of the USRP family is expensive overkill, and the FCDP has this arbitrary restriction at 96 kHz sampling frequency.

Please note that while I may be the only OsmoSDR developer that blogs about this project, it is very much a team effort and I'm only a minor part of that team. Apart from selecting the SAM3U, writing firmware and drivers for it as well as some discussions early on in the project, I didn't have any involvement in the Hardware design. Those credits go to Christian Daniel and Stefan Reimann.

So where do we stand? There are 5 prototypes of the first generation, they look like this:

There are some smaller hardware issues that were easy to work around, but one bigger problem related to the fact that the Si570 programmable oscillator output levels didn't match quite with what the FPGA clock input requires.

There will be a second generation board fixing this and other problems, and hopefully we'll see some progress in the weeks to come.

Firmware-wise, the code is currently scattered over a couple of different repositories, but I'm going to consolidate that soon. If you've worked with OpenPCD or SIMtrace, you will find some similarities: We split the flash of the controller into two partitions: One for the DFU bootloader, and one for the application code. You can then use the USB DFU (Device Firmware Upgrade) standard to quickly update the actual firmware of the device, without having to resort to jumpers or un-plugging and re-plugging of the hardware.

This also meant that I had to re-implement the old sam7dfu code for the SAM3U, which has considerable differences in the USB peripheral, cpu core, board startup code, etc. So it's really a reimplementation than a port. The good news is that I tried to make it as general as possible and integrate it with at91lib, Atmels reference code. So it should be easier to use it with other Atmel SoCs like the sam3s which I want to use e.g. in SIMtrace v2.

[ /electronics | permanent link ]