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blosxom


Contact/Impressum

       
Thu, 01 Mar 2012
More research into the Motorola Horizon macro and Mo-bis

Once upon a time there was an Americans company called Motorola, and they decided to implement GSM. Unfortunately they decided to deviate significantly from the specification and implement their own proprietary back-haul protocol between BTS and BSC, called Mo-bis. It replaces the standardized A-bis interface.

Today, There are plenty of phased-out Motorola Horizon / Horizon II macro BTSs that have been phased out. Basically you can get them for scrap value, which makes them an ideal target for GSM enthusiasts willing to run a single-cell network with little investment. So while there are actually people who are interested in operating a power-consuming device roughly the size of a washing machine in their home/office - they are normally not interested in running a 19" rack sized Motorola BSC with it. Also, the BSCs are much less frequently to be found compared to the BTS.

So it would be great to support Mo-bis from within OpenBSC. A couple of brave young men have set out to try the seemingly impossible. There's absolutely zero documentation available on that protocol, and no wireshark support either. However, the University of Brno (Czech) has a functional Motorola BTS + BSC setup, and I was able to obtain protocol traces from them and actually experiment with the equipment in their lab.

The entire Motorola GSM architecture seems to be over-engineered without end. Basically you are looking at a distributed computer from the early 1990ies. Lots of processor cards (m68k, ppc) interconnected by HDLC links on top of synchronous 2Mbps links with 64k timeslots. Those links are available e.g. on the backplane of the BTS as a TDM highway. So basically even inside the BTS, the individual processors talk over E1 to each other. In the BSC, there is a token ring based LAN between some of the cards instead. And the MCUF in the BTS even supports to transport those proprietary inter-cpu links via fiber optic (!).

Each processor has a 16bit identifier by which it can be addressed in form of physical addresses. Individual processes on the processors have fixed process identifiers, and they allocate a variety of mailboxes in which they can receive messages from remote processors. There are routing functions at intermediate notes.

So any process on any processor card can send messages to any mailbox of any other process on any other processor, independent of its physical location (locally at the BTS, or at the remote BSC, or even at remote BTSs).

Besides physical addresses, there are also functional addresses. Thos addresses are used particularly to support fail-over. Every board in a BTS and BSC can be fully redundant, and if you use physical addresses, you would address one of the two redundant boards. Using functional addresses, you address the function they both can perform, and some routing magic will make sure it ends up at the current active node in the pair.

There are multiple processors in every TRX, and a couple of processors for each BTS, processors in the E1 line cards, etc. Now speaking of the actual Mo-bis interface: It seems to be a weird mixture between 08.58 (RSL) and 08.08 (BSSAP/BSSMAP). However, after staring at the messages sufficiently long, I have been able to write a more or less complete wireshark dissector for them. Radio Channel Activation (RACH/IMM.ASS) are for example handled directly inside the BTS, they don't exist as transactions on the Mo-bis like they do in A-bis.

So implementing the actual location update / MO+MT voice call and SMS related transactions is actually not all that hard. What makes things really difficult is the way the BTS is initialized at startup. Basically what resembles the OML part of standardized A-bis.

There is a lot of low-level management and bring-up of the individual processes and boards, and the download of a large 500 kByte-sized BLOB simply called database. This binary database contains literally hundreds of configuration parameters for the BTS and its neighbors. It also contains sophisticated configuration of the message routers, the switching/multiplexing of 64k timeslots on the various links, information on redundant paths within the back-haul network, etc.

Interestingly, using the password combination 3beatles and 4stooges on any of the serial consoles of the BTS or BSC, you can enter into a "god-mode" which permits you to enter the executive monitor (EMON). The executive is the operating system they run on both m68k and ppc processors. It provides access to something like a syslog of messages from the various processes, and you can manually generate messages that are to be sent to mailboxes of processes. You can inspect the object table (application programs an databases), read/write to PCMCIA flash cards, read and write to logical and physical memory, inspect CPU and I/O usage and much more. In fact, the integrated Code Object Manager (COM) even allows the processors to synchronize their code versions and remotely boot other CPUS via HDLC channels.

For a communications system geek like myself, it's extremely fascinating to see such a sophisticated and versatile system. I only wonder why on earth somebody would come up with something as complex, only to connect a couple of BTSs to a BSC. Thus, the only logical explanation is that Motorola has developed this distributed proprietary computing system way before they went into GSM, and they probably just recycled it as it already existed.

If anyone knows more about the history of this, I would be excited to hear about it. It literally feels like being an archaeologist. Analyzing ancient technology from our forefathers. But then, it only is 20 odd years old. The only time I had a similar feeling was when I briefly came in touch with IBM mainframes in 2001 and looking at IBMs SNA protocol stack.

[ /gsm | permanent link ]