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blosxom


Contact/Impressum

       
Mon, 21 May 2012
Kevin Redon starts collaborative Osmocom project to collect terminal profile

As Kevin Redon writes in his blog, he has created some tools and a project for collaboratively gathering a database on the TERMINAL PROFILE capabilities of mobile phones.

The terminal profile describes which particular features regarding proactive sim or sim application toolkit a given phone supports.

This is not only important for SIM application / SIM toolkit developers, but it is also an important factor when trying to analyze the potential threat that can originate from a malicious SIM card attack.

I personally see no reason why my phone should ever report its GPS position to the SIM card, or why the SIM card should be able to re-write the nubers I'm dialling. Yes, there are cases where such features are useful, but then they should be explicitly enabled by the user, and the default should be that they are all switched off.

Who knows, after all, with some attention to this problem we might still see a SIM firewall / proxy, that you can put between the SIM and the phone to prevent any of those features from being (mis)used.

So all you need to do to contribute to the database is some way how you can read out the terminal profile from your mobile phone(s), and use Kevin's tool to upload it to the public website. And hwo do you read out the terminal profile? For example by using Osmocom SIMtrace to sniff the communication between SIM card and phone.

[ /gsm | permanent link ]

Openmoko USB Product ID and IEEE OUI (Ethernet MAC Address) range available to the community

As it has been quite some time since Openmoko, Inc. (the company) has released any hardware, I have obtained the permission to "donate" the Openmoko-assigned USB Product ID and IEEE OUI (MAC Address) allocations to the community.

As the actual allocations cannot be transferred unless the registrant (Openmoko. Inc.) is sold, the official registration will remain with Openmoko Inc. while the various Free / Open Source Software and hardware communities can make use of the range.

Registering a USB Vendor ID is expensive (USD 2000), and even if it wasn't for the money, many companies (let even aside community projects) will never require the 65535 product IDs allocated within that one USB Vendor ID.

As for Ethernet/Wifi/Bluetooth MAC addresses, they are allocated from the IEE OUI number ranges, which are also quite expensive (USD 1600) - but at least you get 16.7 million (24bit) and not just 16bit like USB ;)

So if you are running a small homebrew or community built project that implements a USB device or Ethernet ports, and either the software or the hardware of it is available under a free software / open source license, you can follow the instructions given at the pages in the Openmoko wiki that I linked above and request an allocation.

I'd like to thank Openmoko Inc. and especially Sean Moss-Pultz for making this donation.

[ /electronics | permanent link ]

Sun, 20 May 2012
osmo-lea6t-gps timing module DIY kits available

Due to lots of other work, it took quite some time between my initial blog post about the omso-lea6t-gps board and the point where we are able to offically sell kits in the sysmocom webshop. The primary reason is: The people for whom we primarily built the board (i.e. the Osmocom developers) all have one and are happy with it ;)

But repeated inquiries by e-mail and otherwise have shown there is more interest. However, for a hand ful of boards we cannot make an automated production run in a SMT assembly line. So for the time being, we are only selling DYI kits, consisting of a digikey-packaged component kit including all components, plus the PCB, as well as the LEA-6T module.

Anyone who is interested in such a timing module DIY kit can now order from the sysmocom webshop.

More information on the project, including design materials like schematics can be found at the Osmocom wiki.

[ /osmocom | permanent link ]

Sat, 19 May 2012
Announcing the low-power, light-weight sysmoBTS

It hasn't been a secret that when I co-started a company called sysmocom more than a year ago, it was not about opening a webshop that sells cheap phones and DYI electronics kits to the larger community. Rather, it was to develop and sell exciting products surrounding Free Software and mobile communications.

There are of course the more or less obvious things to do, like system integration of OpenBSC and the related software on embedded systems, selling them as appliances including training, support and maintenance service.

However, we of course also want to more than that. Today it is my pleasure to say that the availability of our first BTS product called sysmoBTS has been officially announced.

See the news item, the product page and the data sheet for more information.

To make it very clear in the beginning: sysmoBTS is not an open hardware project. The schematics and layout files are proprietary and not disclosed publicly. Such is the FPGA bitstream and the layer1 inside the DSP.

However, any code running on the integrated ARM processor is available as free software. This includes a yocto/poky-built Embedded Linux distribution featuring u-boot, the Linux kernel (including all kernel modules!), the osmo-bts and OpenBSC software as well as many other Free Software packages.

We think this is a reasonable compromise between espanding a bit from our previous "BSC and above in Free Software" down to a "BTS Layer2 and above" divide. After all, if you use OpenBSC with a BTS from Siemens, Ericsson, Nokia or ip.access, you don't have access to the source code of anything running inside the BTS at all.

sysmoBTS offers some great new capabilities, such as integrating the BSC or even the entire osmo-nitb onto the ARM/Linux processor inside the BTS hardware itself, creating a less than 500gram, 10W power consuming autonomous GSM network.

I'm going to stop marketing here, but I thought it is one of the major milestones for sysmoocm and thus for what I've spent way too much time on in recent months - and thus deserves to be mentioned here on this personal blog.

[ /gsm | permanent link ]

Fri, 18 May 2012
OsmoSDR boards available for interested developers

I've posted about this on the OsmoSDR blog, so there's no point in copy+pasting it here.

There are still boards available, so feel free to order if you are interested in yet another exciting Osmocom embedded hardware/firmware/driver/software project!

[ /osmocom | permanent link ]

Mon, 07 May 2012
Some follow-up on the Osmocom Berlin meetings

We've now had the first two incarnations of the Osmocom Berlin User Group Meeting. The start was great, and we had probably something around 10 attendees. Some were the usual suspects like the various Osmocom developers living in Berlin. But we also had a number of new people attending each of both of the meetings, which is good.

To my big surprise people are even flying in from other parts of Europe in order to be able to attend. Last time from Sweden, and for the next meeting some folks from the Netherlands have announced themselves.

To an even bigger surprise, the attendee from Sweden announced that he is working for an Ericsson research lab, and apparently they are using OsmocomBB quite a bit inside that lab. They think it's a great tool, and apparently nothing else with the same flexibility (i.e. full source code) is at their hands that can compete.

On the one hand it is surprising to see such a large traditional Telco supplier to start to use such amateur tools like OsmocomBB, which definitely have not had even a fraction of the testing (particularly with various operators in various countries) like the commercial protocol stacks.

On the other hand, if you think more about it, Ericsson is entirely a network equipment supplier today. They have spun off their baseband processor business to become part of ST-Ericsson, they have pulled out of Sony-Ericsson, sold their TEMS product line to Ascom and other bits and pieces to Tieto. So right now, if they need a MS-side protocol stack or engineering phones, they probably have to obtain what is available on the market. And that's unfortunately not all that great, as the products are either

  • Measurement devices aimed at mostly L1 testing / QA (Racal, Agilent, Rohde-Schwarz)
  • Trace mobiles primarily aimed at field testing (TEMS, Sagem OT) and while they provide traces they don't permit you to send arbitrary data or behave spec-incompliant
  • Mobile Phone development platforms (Qualcomm, MTK, Infinenon, ...) which don't necessarily give you the full source code to the stack, and are only available if you actually intend to build a handset

So all in all, the more I think about it, it is actually not too surprising that they ended up with OsmocomBB. It's free (as in free beer) and they get the full source code with it. You need a lot of skills and time to get it running and find your way around how to use it, but I guess if you're working in cellular protocols and embedded systems, it's not that hard.

[ /osmocom | permanent link ]